Islamic State Losing Power

Islamic State Losing Power

Since 2014, the Islamic State has lost 22% of its territory according to recent reports by IHS Jane's 360. 

The loss of access points to the Turkish border, and heightened border security on the Turkish side, have significantly reduced the flow of goods and potential recruits into the Caliphate. Although local smuggling channels still operate, the risk of detection, and therefore the associated cost have skyrocketed.

The Islamic State is increasingly isolated, and being perceived as in decline. This plays into the hands of its main rival, al-Qaeda’s Jabhat al-Nusra, which despite sharing the same ultimate goal of establishing an Islamic caliphate, has criticised the Islamic State for prematurely declaring it. Isolation and further military defeats will make it harder for the Islamic State to attract new recruits to Syria from the pool of foreign jihadis.
— IHS Jane's 360

YNet News reported, "ISIS's presence has diminished in Iraqi cities and regions," said a document released by an Iraqi government spokesperson. It continued saying, "after being in control of 40% of Iraq, the terror group is now in control of only 14% of the country."

Last month, a document put out by the US-led coalition said that ISIS lost approximately 45 percent of its territory in Iraq and 20 percent in Syria. The bottom line is; only Raqqa in Syria and Mosul in Iraq remain completely under the organization's control.

Today the AP is reporting that an Islamic State group spokesman has urged sympathizers in Europe and the U.S. to launch attacks on civilians in teh US and Europe if they are unable to travel to Syria and Iraq, the Islamic State's headquarters. Some have called this a desparate attempt to revive the organization's declining influence, power and fear. 

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