A Busybody and a Murderer—Dangerous Snoopervising

A Busybody and a Murderer—Dangerous Snoopervising

Have you ever considered what a busybody and a murderer have in common? Well, God allowed Peter (are you not surprised it was Peter?!) to write about not being ashamed of suffering for doing good. Then Peter wrote the comparison of the understandable suffering for doing evil, such as, “a murderer or thief or any other kind of criminal, or even as a meddler” (1 Pet. 4:15b). I remember thinking that the word meddler did not fit my concept of a criminal behavior. Have you ever known anyone who has been put in jail as a convicted “meddler—busybody”? Maybe you know a certain busybody who should be constrained behind bars!

I decided to do a little research on the origin of the word meddler. I learned that meddler is taken from the word supervise/supervisor. So, when a woman is a busybody, that is just another word for a woman who is supervising someone else’s family, business, etc. Why would that be such a crime? I realized I was onto something far deeper than a busybody mentality. I coined the phrase, “Snoopervising” to describe this common behavior among controlling women.

One aspect of a woman’s role that is nullified by the busybody/snoopervising woman is the privileged role as “keeper of the home.” That is not a role that means to “keep a woman at home.” The keeper in Greek refers to “guarding what enters the home.” A woman is free to choose what she wants to do outside her home, as long as she does not neglect the guarding of what is entering her home. Too often, when I am supervising someone else’s life, family, home, business, etc., it is easy for me to neglect the guarding of my home. For me to not stand guard over my home makes our home vulnerable to all types of enemies who would enter our home and destroy my marriage and our family life. Such neglect is criminal, and it happens on a daily basis in America, even in Christian homes.

The debate concerning a Christian woman working outside her home can be settled with a simple question. How much time can you give to things outside your home and still stand guard over the things that could enter your home and harm those whom you love? With such an awesome responsibility as the keeper of our home, I am sensitive to the self-inflicted suffering that is mine when I am being a busybody. Some busybodies are bored, silly women, but many are competent, gifted women who sometimes neglect evaluating where they give their attention. Does this person, household, ministry, or task qualify under my God-given responsibilities, or is this part of a “busybody crime”? Am I supervising a marriage, a family, or even a job that is not mine? Do I let my “busybody attitude” escort me into someone else’s area of responsibility?

They should be examples of the good life, so that the younger women may learn to love their husbands and their children, to be sensible and chaste, home-lovers, kind-hearted and willing to adapt themselves to their husbands—a good advertisement for the Christian faith (Titus 2:4-5 Phillips).

(Adapted from “Surrender Your Jr. God Badge—Every Woman’s Struggle with Control” by Jackie Kendall)

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