New Law in Russia Makes Religious Activity in Private Home Illegal

New Law in Russia Makes Religious Activity in Private Home Illegal

Thousands of churches are praying and fasting in Russia in response to the "Yarovaya law" passed last week by Russia President Vladimir Pudin.

The law passed as a "anti-terrorism" will actually restrict evangelism, limit missionaries and make illegal home church gatherings.

Dr. Hannu Haukka, President  of Great Commission Media Ministries, which is actively engaged in Russia, said, “This new situation resembles the Soviet Union in 1929. At that time confession of faith was permitted only in church. Practically speaking, we are back in the same situation. These anti-terrorist laws are some of the most restrictive laws in post-Soviet history.”

Similarly, Dr. Jerry A. Johnson, President & CEO of National Religious Broadcasters, stated, “The enactment of a law restricting the free exercise of religion by any nation should be a matter of grave concern and prayerful action by Christians of all nations. Following a pattern of other human rights abuses, Vladimir Putin’s Russia is criminalizing a central duty for all followers of Christ – sharing our faith. “

Dr. Johnson added, “In keeping with the Apostle Peter’s declaration, ‘We must obey God rather than men’ (Acts 5:29).

CBN reported, "Under the law, foreign missionaries will not be allowed to speak at a church unless they have a work permit from Russian authorities. Furthermore, any discussion about God with non-believers would be considered missionary activity and punishable by law.

This means that anyone as young as 14 who is found preaching could be persecuted. Additionally, religious activity in a private home is not allowed."

 

 

 

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